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  • ME721 - A Survey of the Arabian Gulf
SKU: ME721

ME721 - A Survey of the Arabian Gulf

£203.12Price
A detailed, hand-drawn, manuscript chart of the Gulf dates from 1813. This chart shows the routes of voyages undertaken in 1807, 1813 and 1817. There are two insets; one of Muscat and Muttrah (1785), the other of Busheer (1809) taken from earlier surveys to hand. It is very much in the hand of Captain Eatwell of the Honorable East India company Marine with a note that it was 'Received from Mr Fulton Master RN'.
  • 1785 & 1817

Further Information

Size of Original
Size of Original
Author
Author
Date
Date

Title

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Description

Further Information

A detailed, hand-drawn, manuscript chart of the Gulf dates from 1813. This chart shows the routes of voyages undertaken in 1807, 1813 and 1817. There are two insets; one of Muscat and Muttrah (1785), the other of Busheer (1809) taken from earlier surveys to hand. The survey is very much in the hand of Captain Eatwell of the Honorable East India company Marine with a note that it was 'Received from Mr Fulton Master RN'.

 

The chart shows the entirety of the Persian Gulf from Muscat on the Arabian coast and Mukoa on the Iranian, to the Euphrates and land named as ‘Shat Al Arab’ (now Iraq and Iran). As with most of the surveys dating form this time the chart clearly shares common information, or more precisely lack of' inasmuch as there is almost no detail of the Arabian coastline, east of Bahrain, with only the northern tip of Qatar shown while the coastline of the Emirates is totally misrepresented.

 

Corrections have been made in red ink, at a later date, to show the many important islands, including; Seer Beni Yass (now Sir Bani Yas) or Airaei, Dalmi, Arzenie (now as Arzanah), Dauss, Haulool and others. Captain Eatwell's later chart of the Gulf from 1818 (see Heritage Charts ME720) shows a clear correction as to the outline of the Arabian coastline. The survey data presented on this chart also relates directly to the following surveys of the same region: (See Heritage Charts) ME712, ME812).

 

The manuscript plots the routes of various voyages that were undertaken by HM Sloop Scorpion along the Persian coast, in January to March 1807; and HMS Hesper, which ventured south the Arabian coast in May - July 1813; and a latter addition to the chart, in red, and clearly of a different hand, of the islands, from Captain Maude’s voyage in March 1817.

 

Hydrographical soundings are recorded, as are anchorages, water and vegetation, pearl shoals and fisheries. On the Arabian side: ‘Low sandy coast with trees, some forts, 2 small villages’ are recorded between Boothabeen (Abu Dhabi) and Dobay (Dubai). Of significant note are the remarks relating to these voyages, which, although sometimes difficult to read, are not only informative, but also explanatory and raise questions in themselves.

 

The remarks relating to the Arabian coast go some way to explain the confused overlay of different coastlines and the ‘over longitude’: with ‘no time keeper on board and the weather so continually thick and foggy, no observations could be taken to obtain it’. This is followed by an admittance that ‘the last departure was taken from the Isle of Zara’ and that this is ‘placed to far to the west?’ The remarks are continued with references to the ‘irregularity of the soundings and shoals along the Arabian coast and the discovery of white sand, shells and stones. Of particular note is the remark: ‘the comments to tides appears to be very irregular both in their thought and direction. Frequently there is no … at all and I think but seldom a strong one’. This, and the remark along the western coast (now Mirfa to Ruwais ) which was ‘Very badly laid down’, leads one to question whether the hydrographical work of another was under scrutiny on this voyage. On a final point, the remark, ‘The whole of the Southern coast of the Gulf is very little known and seldom frequented’, emphasises the lack of interest and therefore understanding of the Arabian coast, at this time. In the centre of the chart there are remarks relating to the ‘prevailing north west wind which blow all year round’ and that ‘December and January, are the only months to depend on having southerly winds’. To the right of this are the: ‘Pearl Shoals of HMS Sloop Scorpion 1807’. The remarks at the top of the chart relate to the Busheer inset; providing directions to safely anchor using ‘the flagstaff of the factory’, ‘part of a bluff hill North of Hallelah Peak’, ‘high land’ and ‘a few straggling date palms’.

Size of Original
h25.2" x w36.8"
Author

Mr Fulton, Master RN

Date
1785 & 1817

A detailed, hand-drawn, manuscript chart of the Gulf dates from 1813. This chart shows the routes of voyages undertaken in 1807, 1813 and 1817. There are two insets; one of Muscat and Muttrah (1785), the other of Busheer (1809) taken from earlier surveys to hand. It is very much in the hand of Captain Eatwell of the Honorable East India company Marine with a note that it was 'Received from Mr Fulton Master RN'.

ME721 - A Survey of the Arabian Gulf

ME721

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